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Report shows decline in phosphate binder use in dialysis clinics

June 06, 2013
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A new report from BioTrends Research group found that the use of phosphate binders in the United States has declined in the hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis setting over the past two years.
 
The ChartTrends: Bone and Mineral Metabolism in Dialysis (U.S.) 2013 report is a syndicated report series, in which 251 U.S. nephrologists provided patient chart data on 1,014 dialysis patients in the United States to uncover the management related to bone and mineral metabolism. 

The report also found that physicians are initiating phosphate binders at higher serum phosphorous levels compared to last year. In addition, a significantly higher percentage of patient charts indicate that cost and the belief that phosphorous is low in the priority of treatment as two reasons for non-binder use compared to 2012.
 
The report also finds that Sanofi’s sevelamer (Renagel, Renvela) is the market share leader in the dialysis patient population, with little change in share amongst the other binder brands compared to last year, with the exception of a decline in the use of calcium acetate.
 
Patients on non-calcium based binders (particularly Shire’s Fosrenol) are more likely to be on Amgen’s Sensipar compared to those on calcium-based binders, particularly calcium acetate.  From 2012 to 2013, use of Sensipar appears to be declining in the hemodialysis patient population.
 
“Despite the delay in the inclusion of orals in the dialysis bundle, we are starting to see changes in the dialysis setting likely driven by increased scrutiny and awareness of the total costs of treatment,” said BioTrends Director Rob Dubman. “For example, we are now finding a rise in the use of nutritional Vitamin D and less use of AbbVie’s Zemplar compared with 2012.”
 

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