In recognition of National Minority Health Month, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Office of Minority Health (CMS OMH) released a pair of reports detailing the quality of care received by people enrolled in Medicare Advantage (MA).

One report compares quality of care for women and men while the other report looks at racial and ethnic differences in health care experiences and clinical care, among women and men

The first report focusing on gender revealed sizable differences in quality of treatment for certain conditions among MA beneficiaries. In particular, women received better treatment for chronic lung disease and rheumatoid arthritis and were more likely than men to receive proper follow-up care after being hospitalized for a mental health disorder.

In contrast, women were less likely than men to receive timely treatment for alcohol or drug dependence, and they were more likely to be dispensed medications that are potentially harmful to people with certain medical conditions such as dementia.

Women with diabetes (93.3%) were as likely as men (93.4%) with diabetes to have had medical attention for nephropathy in the past year.

Women with diabetes (57.6%) were less likely than men with diabetes (58.1%) to have their blood pressure under control.

The second report on racial and ethnic group comparisons separated by gender, is a follow-up to a November 2016 report released by CMS Office of Minority Health which presented racial and ethnic group comparisons without stratifying by gender.

The new report shows that disparities between black and white MA beneficiaries in rates of colorectal cancer screening, treatment for chronic lung disease and acute myocardial infarction, and management of rheumatoid arthritis were larger for men than for women.

Asian or Pacific Islander (API) (95.4%), black (94.1%), and Hispanic women (95.5%) with diabetes were more likely than white women (92.2%) with diabetes to have had medical attention for nephropathy in the past year.

API (95.7%), black (93.4%), and Hispanic (95.3%) men with diabetes were more likely than white men (92.6%) with diabetes to have had medical attention for nephropathy in the past year.